Category: Curriculum

Josiah’s Reforms | 2 Chronicles 34–35

By | May 15, 2015

When you check out a book from the library, how many authors are credited with writing the book? Some books may list two or three authors, but the vast majority have just one. Imagine how difficult it would be to have several authors from different backgrounds each write a chapter of a book and still have the story make sense. Strangely enough, this is exactly what God chose to do.

The Bible is comprised of 66 books written by over 40 different people over a period of 1,500 years. The authors lived in different places, spoke different languages, and had different walks of life: kings, physicians, fishermen, tax collectors, priests, royal servants, and slaves. The Bible addresses many topics: faith, love, family, government, education, good vs. evil, money, and law. None of the authors knew what the other authors were writing, yet each book of the Bible points to one big story—God’s plan for mankind. In 2 Peter 1:21, we read, “For prophecy never had its origin in the human will, but prophets, though human, spoke from God as they were carried along by the Holy Spirit.” God may have used various authors, but He orchestrated the whole thing. There is no part of Scripture that did not originate from heaven.

The priest, Hilkiah, ran with joy to tell Josiah that he had found the Book of the Law. God’s Word to His people had been found, and they wasted no time in having it read. Even though you may have multiple copies of the Bible in your house, it’s lost until you spend time reading it.


Review: Last week we learned about the prophet Micah and his message from God to Judah. The leaders of Judah were responsible for leading the people astray and worshipping false gods. They refused to believe they were guilty of sin and blindly expected God to save them from destruction. Micah gave Judah the formula to a righteous relationship with God.

 

Screen Shot 2015-05-15 at 11.05.01 PMWhat three things did Micah say the people should do to live righteously? Act justly, love mercy, and walk humbly with God.

 

Scripture Reading: 2 Chronicles 34-35

 

Memory Verse: Zephaniah 3:17

The LORD your God is with you, He is mighty to save. He will take great delight in you, He will quiet you with His love, He will rejoice over you with singing.”

Use the following motions to teach this unit’s memory verse, or make up your own motions:

The Lord your God (point both hands to heaven)

Is with you (draw arms in to a hug)

He is mighty to save (raise both arms in strength)

He will take great delight in you (use fingers to draw a smile on your face) He will quiet you (use finger over mouth)

With His love (cross arms over heart)

He will rejoice over you with singing (jump up and down in celebration)


TALK

Josiah is the third boy king. Joash became king when he was seven, and Manasseh became king when he was twelve. Joash started well, but ended terribly. Manasseh started terribly but repented and ended well.

  • How old was Josiah when he became king?
    • 8 years old.
  • In 2 Chronicles 33:22, how does the Bible describe Josiah’s father, Amon?
    • He did evil in the eyes of the Lord.
  • How does the Bible describe Josiah?
    • He did what was right in the eyes of the Lord and walked in the ways of his father David, not turning aside to the right or to the left. Since Josiah’s father was wicked, how do you think Josiah learned how to do what was right? How important is it to listen to godly teaching even when you are young?
  • When Josiah was only 12 years old, he began to purge Judah and Jerusalem. What things did he do?
    • Took down the Asherah poles, idols, and cast images; tore down the altars of Baal; cut down the incense altars. Josiah could have thought that because he was so young he couldn’t make a difference. It would have been much easier for him to have just left things the way they were. Read 1 Timothy 4:12. What does it say about being young? Paul is encouraging Timothy that he can still be a godly example in spite of his young age. We, too, can be examples at any age in speech, conduct, love, faith, and purity. How can you be an example in these ways to family, classmates, or neighbors?
  • While Hilkiah, the high priest, was supervising the repair of the temple, he found something. What was it?
    • The Book of the Law. This was possibly the first five books of the Bible. The Bible says it was found, which means it had been lost. The actual book had not only been lost to the people, but the God of the book had been lost to them because they were not living according to His commands. The Book of the Law was just laying around somewhere collecting dust from lack of use. Where is your Bible? Is it on the shelf collecting dust, only to be brought out on Sunday? Whether or not we read God’s Word, whatever God said will still happen, because God’s Word is eternal. (Psalm 119:89)
  • What did Josiah do when the Book of the Law was read to him?
    • He tore his robes and sent Hilkiah to the prophet to interpret what was written in the Law.
  • What did the prophet say would happen?
    • The prophet told Hilkiah that judgment was coming to Judah because of their sins against God. This would not happen until after the death of Josiah because he humbled himself before God, and God promised to spare him the grief.
  • What event did Josiah celebrate?
    • The Passover. The Bible says that it had not been observed to such an extent since the days of Samuel; no other king celebrated the Passover as did Josiah. This brought the people back to the time when God had delivered them from Egypt; back to their covenant with God.

 


 

PRAY

Adoration: “Your word, O Lord, is eternal; it stands firm in the heavens” (Psalm 119:89). Give praise to God that He is unchanging and that His Word is forever.

Confession: “. . . they have not acted in accordance with all that is written in this book” (2 Chronicles 34:21). Confess to God specifically when you have not acted according to His Word.

Thanksgiving: “So at that time the entire service of the Lord was carried out for the celebration of the Passover . . .” (2 Chronicles 35:16). The Israelites celebrated what God had done for them when He delivered them from the Death Angel. Give thanks to God as a celebration of a specific time when He helped you.

Supplication: “The king renewed the covenant of the Lord—to follow the Lord and keep His commands, regulations and decrees with all his heart and all his soul, and to obey the words of the covenant written in this book” (2 Chronicles 34:31). Make a covenant with God to keep His commands. Ask God to give you the strength to keep your covenant.



DO

Supplies: Any set of blocks that can be used to stack and build; stopwatch Place the blocks in a pile on a hard surface.

Divide into 2 teams.

When you say “Go” the first person on Team 1 runs to the blocks and sets one up, then runs back to tag the next person in line. Continue the relay for one minute to build a tower as high as the team can. The second team now has one minute to take apart the tower one block at a time. Team 1 (the building team) now has 30 seconds to go back and rebuild as much of the tower as possible. Then Team 2 has 30 seconds to take apart the tower one block at a time. Team 1 rebuilds as much as possible in 15 seconds (one block at a time), then Team 2 has 15 seconds to take apart as much as they can one block at a time.

Use this activity to discuss the wicked and righteous kings of Judah. A wicked king would reign and build up the idols and altars to worship false gods. Then a righteous king would reign and tear down the altars. A wicked king would reign and build the altars again. A righteous king would again tear them down. The people of Judah were in a cycle which would eventually lead them into captivity.

Do you remember the kings Hezekiah, Manasseh, and Amon? Were they were wicked or righteous?

Hezekiah—righteous

Manasseh—wicked and then turned to God

Amon—wicked

 

(Lesson: May 17th)

talk.pray.do – May

By | May 7, 2015

 

Screen Shot 2015-05-07 at 10.24.43 PM

TALK

  • Can you name all the fruits of the Spirit? Which comes easily to you? Which one is the hardest?
  • What is Joy? Who is the most joyful person that you know? What do they do that makes you think they are joyful?
  • What is a peacemaker? Who are some peacemakers you know?
  • What does it mean to be patient? Is it hard to be patient sometimes? Why?
  • What is kindness? Who was the last person you showed kindness to?

 

PRAY

Practice the fruits of the spirit this week. Faithfully pray and ask God for help. Do something good for someone. Practice self-control when your emotions or desires are leading you to lose control. Be gentle with your actions and kind with your words.

 

DO

This week join with us on the Vista Parents blog for devotional prompts on how to be a family rooted in the Fruit of the Spirit. Daily devotional posted on the different fruits of the spirits. Enjoy planting the wildflowers together as a family.

 

Join with us on social media using the #KCrooted #talkpraydo

Micah, Prophet to Judah | Micah 1–7

By | April 28, 2015

When you love and respect someone, the best way to show it is by trying to be more like him or her. For example, while you may get annoyed when your younger brother copies everything you do, it isn’t because he’s trying to annoy you (okay, maybe sometimes he is), it’s just that he thinks you’re so cool that he wants to be more like you.

God desires us to be like Him. He loves it when we copy Him. In fact, He purposely gives us examples of how He wants us to copy Him. In Micah 6:8, God gives us three ways that we can copy His example: act justly, love mercy, and walk humbly with God. God is just when He opposes the proud and gives grace to the humble (James 4:6). God shows mercy when He does not abandon His people (Nehemiah 9:31). God showed humility when He sent His perfect Son, Jesus, to earth as a man to die in our place (Philippians 2:6–8).

Charles Caleb Colton, a 19th century cleric, penned the phrase, “Imitation is the highest form of flattery.” It is a way of showing adoration toward the one you are imitating; a desire for him or her to be your role model. Who are you trying to imitate; who do you want to be like? Phillipians 2:5 tells us that our attitude should be the same as that of Christ Jesus.

 

Review: Last week we learned details about the promised Messiah. Isaiah described the pain and suffering the Messiah would suffer, but he also prophesied that the Messiah would be killed and then raised from the dead. Isaiah’s message was one of hope to an exiled people. God wanted them to know He had not forgotten about them and that He always keeps His promises.

As believers who have accepted Jesus as our Savior, what should we do with the message of the Messiah? We should be passing along the Good News to others who do not know Jesus.

Screen Shot 2015-04-28 at 10.38.24 AMMemory Verse:  Zephaniah 3:17: “The LORD your God is with you, he is mighty to save. He will take great delight in you, he will quiet you with his love, he will rejoice over you with singing.”

 


 

Talk:

Micah was a prophet during the same time as the prophet Isaiah. In the first verse of the first chapter of Micah, we learn that Micah prophesied during the reigns of Jotham, Ahaz, and Hezekiah in Judah.

  • In Micah 6:1–5, God reminds Israel what He has done for them in the past. What are some of the ways God had saved them?
    • Delivered from slavery in Egypt; delivered from King Balak and the evil prophet, Balaam; showed His righteous acts in Gilgal.
  • Who does Micah say is responsible for the judgment being brought on Judah? (3:9–12) The leaders were leading the people astray. What does he say will happen to them?
    • They will be completely destroyed.
  • Micah is one of the few prophets who comes right out and explains why he has come. What two things does Micah explain about his message in Micah 3:8?
    • Micah is empowered by God’s Spirit and his message is to declare the sin of God’s people.
  • Verse 11 says that the leaders are under the false impression that God is still among them and that no harm will come to them. Read 2 Peter 1:5–10. How does it describe people who have forsaken righteousness and have instead chosen to do things their own way?
    • They have become nearsighted and blind. In this passage nearsighted means “to shut the eyes.” It is a willful choice. The leaders of Judah chose to shut their eyes to the truth of their sin and forget the God of their salvation. We are often like the leaders of Judah: we tell a “little white lie” and don’t confess it as sin; we call somebody a name; we don’t spend daily time with God. Each time we don’t acknowledge the truth of our sin, we become a little more nearsighted and forgetful of the God who cleansed us from our sin.
  • Micah 6:8 makes it clear how God expects His people to live. What are the three ways Micah mentions? Act justly, love mercy, and walk humbly with your God. Can this description be used for the way we live? Do we act fairly? Do we show compassion and kindness to everyone around us? Do we walk carefully or wisely with our God, making Him and His commands more important than our own desires?
  • As with Isaiah, Micah gave a message of hope. What does he say in Micah 7:18–20?
    • God delights in showing mercy; He will have compassion again; He will hurl their iniquities into the sea; He will remain faithful to His covenant.

 

Pray:

Use 2 Peter 1:5–6 and Micah 6:8.

Ask God to increase righteous qualities in your life. Put your name in the verse, and mention the qualities by name. (For this very reason, I, (your name), will make every effort to . . . ) Commit to God that you will be imitators of Him; “to act justly and to love mercy and to walk humbly” with Him.

 


Do:

Supplies: Bible Memory Verse for this unit

Use the following motions to teach this unit’s memory verse, or make up your own motions:

The Lord your God (point both hands to heaven)

Is with you (draw arms in to a hug)

He is mighty to save (raise both arms in strength)

He will take great delight in you (use fingers to draw a smile on your face) He will quiet you (use finger over mouth)

With His love (cross arms over heart)

He will rejoice over you with singing (jump up and down in celebration)

Amos, Prophet to Israel | Amos 1-9

By | February 22, 2015

Can you recite the books of the Bible? Maybe you learned a song that helped you remember the order of the books. The song comes in handy when you need to locate a specific book of the Bible. What you may not be aware of, though, is that the order in which the books are arranged is not entirely chronologically correct— they aren’t all placed in the Bible in the order that they were written or in the order that the events recorded there occurred. That does not mean that the content of the books is inaccurate or was not inspired by God. Every word of the Bible is from God. In 2 Peter 1:21 we read, “For prophecy never had its origin in the human will, but prophets, though human, spoke from God as they were carried along by the Holy Spirit.”

Scholars of the English Bible arranged the books according to subject categories. For example, all of the prophets (Isaiah, Jeremiah, Lamentations, Ezekiel, Daniel, Hosea, Joel, Amos, Obadiah, etc.) were arranged together.

As we turn to the book of Amos this week, we can understand it better if we know that the events recorded

in Amos took place at the same time as the events in 2 Kings, which is found much earlier in the Old Testament. Amos is giving the prophecy from God to the nation of Israel during the reign of Jeroboam, recorded in 2 Kings.

We learned in 2 Kings 17 that God was done being patient with Israel and that they were going to be exiled from their country. Amos is the prophet that delivered the bad news to Israel.

Review : Last week, we learned how the Northern Kingdom, Israel, continuously sinned against God. They worshipped other gods and built high places to worship their false gods. As a result, God had run out of patience with them. “So the Lord was very angry with Israel and removed them from his presence” (2 Kings 17:18).

What was the result of Israel’s continuous sin against God? They were taken captive and deported to Assyria

Scripture Reading: Amos 7:1–16 and Amos 9:11–15.

Reading God’s Word is the most important part of family worship. If you don’t have time to do anything else, be sure to do this section.

Memory Verse: Jonah 4:2b: “I knew that you are a gracious and compassionate God, slow to anger and abounding in love, a God who relents from sending calamity.”

Screen Shot 2015-02-22 at 10.43.30 AM Screen Shot 2015-02-22 at 10.43.19 AMTalk

The first chapter of Amos talks about God’s judgment against the nations surrounding Israel. At first, Israel felt good about Amos’ message because they felt that the other nations deserved God’s judgment.

 

  • How often do we look at what other people are doing wrong instead of looking at our own hearts? Are we happy when someone gets punished?

Take this time to talk about accountability for our own actions and judging other people. Using this week’s memory verse, discuss God’s compassion and His great love to all people, and His desire to not send His judgment.

 

  • Amos 2:4 states the reason that Israel will be judged. What was the reason?

They rejected the law of the Lord and have not kept His decrees; they worshipped false gods.

  • Amos was given visions by God as to how God was going to send His judgment against Israel. What were the first two visions showing?

God was going to send locust to devour the land; God was going to send fire to consume the land.

  • Why did God not send the locusts or the fire?

Amos begged God not to send them; that the punishment would be too great. Moses had done the same thing for Israel many times in the desert.

  • How did King Jeroboam react to Amos’ message?

He told Amos to leave Israel and go back home to Judah. The hearts of the people were not willing to listen. How does your heart react when you have been corrected or disciplined? Do you admit your mistake and ask forgiveness, or do you refuse to listen to what God is trying to teach you?

  • Although God’s message to Israel was one of despair, the book of Amos ends with a word of hope for Israel. What was God’s promise to Israel?

One day Israel would be restored and returned to the land that God promised them many years before.

 

Pray:   Using handwritten chain links, confess to God the ways you sin against Him. Ask God to help you to have a heart willing to receive discipline and change your ways so that you can be restored to Him. Give thanks to God for loving you so much that He desires you to be in fellowship with Him.

 

 

Do:

Materials: a handheld mirror

Invite each family member to take a long look in the handheld mirror. Ask family members to put the mirror down and then describe what they look like in as much detail as they can. See who can describe the most features without looking back in the mirror.

Read Colossians 1:19-20. Say: “Jesus is the earthly representation of God. The Bible shows us through Jesusʼ life what God is like. When we read about Jesus and how He never sinned, we know how God wants us to live.”

Remind your kids that Amos was a shepherd and a farmer. Ask your kids to tell what they want to be when they grow up. Affirm their choices and tell them that no matter what God leads them to do, He also wants them to tell other people about Jesus Christ.

 

(Vista Dublin lesson February 22nd and Vista Worthington lesson March 8th)

The Nothern Kingdom was Destroyed

By | February 14, 2015

The nation of Israel was familiar with captivity. They were slaves in Egypt for over four hundred years before God delivered them. Throughout their wilderness travels, they constantly turned their backs on God and worshipped idols. After entering the Promise Land, God sent judges to rescue them against enemies because they had turned against God. They had numerous kings that led them in doing evil in the eyes of the Lord. The Bible talks about God’s anger burning against the people, but He always forgave and rescued them when they repented and turned back to Him. Today’s story ends quite differently. God has been pushed too far, and a new phrase appears on the pages of 2 Kings…God ”removed them from his presence”. God has now turned His back on Israel. He will allow them to once again be taken into captivity.

Although Israel seemed to have no hope, God did promise that He would someday return Israel to their homeland (Isaiah 11:10-12). Even more importantly, God promised to send a Messiah. That promise was fulfilled in Jesus Christ. God turned His back on His own Son because of our sin, but then Jesus was raised from the dead, and the perfect sacrifice was given for us.

 

Screen Shot 2015-01-29 at 9.32.42 AMLast week we learned how God healed Naaman. Naaman, a valiant soldier in Aram’s army, had leprosy. A servant girl told him to go see Elisha for healing. Naaman was told to wash in the Jordan River seven times for healing. At first, Naaman refused, but his servants convinced him to obey. Naaman was com- pletely healed.

What did Naaman say after he was healed? “Now I know that there is no God in all the world except in Israel”

 

Scripture Reading: 2 Kings 17:1-23

Memory Verse: “Turn from your evil ways. Observe my commands and decrees in accordance with the entire Law that I commanded your fathers to obey” 2 Kings 17:13b

 

 

TALK:Screen Shot 2015-01-29 at 9.32.26 AM

  1. Who was the king of Israel during this time? Was he good or evil?

King Hoshea did evil in the eyes of the Lord.

  1. What king attacked Israel?

Shalmaneser the king of Assyria.

  1. What did the king of Assyria do with the Israelites?

He took the Israelites captive and de ported them to Assyria.

  1. Reread verse 7; what does the Bible say is the reason Israel was taken captive? “All this took place because the Israelites had sinned against the Lord their God.”
  2. List some examples of things the Israelites did to sin against God.

They worshipped other gods; they secretly did things against the Lord; they built high places, set up sacred stones and Asherah poles, practiced witchcraft.

  1. God had warned all the nation of Israel against such evil practices, but they ignored God time and again. What phrase tells us that God had enough? (v 18-20)

“So the Lord was very angry with Israel and removed them from his presence…the Lord rejected all the people of Israel.”

  1. The nation of Israel not only went against the Sinai covenant with God, but they also ignored the words of the prophets that God had sent to them as warnings. God describes them as stiff-necked people comparing them with stubborn oxen refusing to move when needed. Are you sometimes stiff-necked? Talk about things we do that would ignore God’s Words. What should we do right away when we have sinned against God?

 

PRAY:

Adoration: Praise God that He is the one and only true God.
Confession: Confess a specific time when you ignored God’s Word and did evil in His eyes. Thanksgiving: Offer thanks to God for His patience and forgiveness.
Supplication: Ask God to help keep the idols out of your life and to obey His Word.

 

DO:

True or False Wall Instructions

  1. Choose 2 opposite walls—label one as FALSE and the other as TRUE.
  2. Use the questions below to review the five lessons from this unit.
  3. Have everyone stand in the middle of the room.
  4. After reading a question, each person will run to the wall he thinks is the correct answer. 
Questions
  5. After the nation of Israel was divided, the Northern Kingdom had several kings that loved and obeyed the Lord. False—they did what was evil in the eyes of the Lord.
  6. King Ahab was married to Queen Jezebel. True
  7. The prophet Samuel challenged King Ahab and the prophets of Baal. False—Elijah challenged.
  8. Israel was guilty of worshipping Baal. True
  9. Queen Jezebel threatened to kill Elijah. True
  10. On Mt. Carmel, Elijah poured oil on the sacrifice. False—he poured water
  11. On Mt. Carmel, God proved He was real by sending fire from heaven. True
  12. Elijah was afraid of Queen Esther. False—it was Queen Jezebel
  13. Commander Naaman was cured of blindness. False—it was leprosy
  14. Naaman was told to wash in the Jordan River. True
  15. The last king of the Northern Kingdom was Ahab. False—it was Hoshea
  16. The prophet Elijah took the place of Elisha. False—Elisha replaced Elijah

 

(Vista Dublin lesson February 15th, Vista Worthington Lesson, March 1st)

 

 

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