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Modeling healthy self-esteem for your family

Screen Shot 2015-04-22 at 9.54.36 AMHave you seen the Dove Campaign’s new video called “Choose Beautiful”?

It’s a hidden-camera showcase of women choosing between two entrance doors – one labeled “Beautiful” and the other labeled “Average.”

We bet you can guess which door was most popular.

(Hint: research shows that only 4% of women think of themselves as beautiful.)

Unsurprisingly, most participants chose the latter, struggling through deflation and regret when they were interviewed afterwards. They wished they’d had the courage to see themselves in a better light.

Frankly, we can often relate to that feeling as parents.

None of us are experts in raising kids. We see our faults and sometimes don’t feel all that “beautiful” as moms and dads. Even “average” seems likes a stretch on some days.

But there’s good news: through God’s grace we can lay down our insecurities and choose to see the beauty in our best effort to love and lead our kids.

So go ahead, parents—pick the “beautiful door” and take your kids through it with you, too.

Let one of the greatest influencers of your kid’s self-esteem be your own healthy self-esteem.

 
LOVE BOLDLY | Model healthy self-esteem with these 5 personal challenges

  • No more performance-addiction: Genuine humility recognizes that we’re worth having relationships with—not because of achievement—but because of God’s love and grace. If you want your kids to own this, first own it yourself and then extend it to them.
  • No more comparing: Don’t let the lives, appearance, or personality of others determine who you feel you need to be. Celebrate what they’re doing well without feeling like you have to duplicate it. Practice saying, “Good for them, but that may not be for me.”
  • No more name-calling: We can spend years unlearning negative things we think about ourselves. Truth? You’re more than any label or name placed on you. Whenever you realize you’re putting yourself down (especially in front of your kids), stop and actually take the time to reverse it out loud. Say, “You know what? I may have that fault, but we’re more than our faults, aren’t we?”
  • No more cover-ups: Don’t be afraid to apologize when you’ve made a mistake. It’s okay to be imperfect, but don’t let that keep you from asking for forgiveness when you know mess up. Accepting your mistakes keeps you from being ashamed by them, and teaches your kids to do the same.
  • No more unloading: One of our challenges as parents is considering what’s appropriate to share with our kids, especially as they get older. Be honest, but resist the urge to treat your child as a therapist who’s role is to help you sort out your insecurities, and find an alternative outlet.